Orion Constellation Time-lapse

Specification

Date Taken: 20/03/2018 Telescope: N/A Diameter: N/A Lens: 18-55mm (Focused at 21mm) Mount: SkyWatcher Star Adventurer Mini Camera: Canon EOS 1000D ISO: 1600 Exposure Light Frames: 250 x 30 sec Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Stacking program: Windows Movie Maker Post Processing: N/A

Directions

For those of you that have a standard SkyWatcher Star Adventurer or the Star Adventurer Mini your amazing bit of kit has the ability to create time-lapse Astro-videos. This guide is based on using the Star Adventurer MINI. If you have the Standard Star Adventurer then there is a different guide here. Star Adventurer Advanced Firmware As you can see from the gif above this type of time-lapse keeps the foreground still while the stars move across the sky. Unfortunately the time-lapse I created above was only to try out the feature hence why there isn’t a prettier foreground. The flashes that you see is my neighbours annoying night light. I think that this is an amazing feature of the Star Adventurer range and I will be creating a better thought out time-lapse in the near future, but for the time being I will try to explain how it was created. Firstly, set up as you normally would do but this time you will be using a wide field lens to capture a large area of the sky and foreground. Next, instead of connecting your camera to the laptop or computer use the shutter cable supplied with the Star Adventurer and connect one end to the Star Adventurer mount and the other end to the camera. You need to make sure that you have a memory card in the camera of at least 8GB to be on the safe side. To keep the foreground still the Star Adventurer takes a standard 30 second tracked exposure. It then swings back to its original position and takes another 30 second tracked exposure. It does this for the set amount of exposures that is set before hand.(I will go through the settings below) exposure - back, exposure - back, exposure - back etc.…. so, every time the mount returns to its original position the houses have, obviously, stayed where they are but the stars have, again obviously, moved a bit further on. Now, the long exposure are needed to take in the light from the stars as you would for any standard astrophoto but in this case it is shot in wide field to get as much of the sky to travel past the stationary houses as possible. The effect is like thumbing your way through a flicker book. I then loaded all 250 subs into Windows Movie Maker (These are automatically saved as jpgs instead of raw) and let the software create the gif/movie that you see above.
If you use the Star Adventurer Mini then you will be familiar with the screen to the left. Exposure time The length of time it takes to capture all the subs The length of the completed video How many subs will be taken This is a screen-shot recreation of the exact settings that I used within the Star Adventurer Mini Console that I downloaded from the Android Play Store and is the official app for controlling the Star Adventurer Mini. I then clicked “run” and the mount controlled the camera so when I came out 1 hour & 45 mins later it had finished and all i had to do was to transfer the individual picture files to my laptop and create the movie in Movie Maker.
September - April
© Paul’s Astrophotography 2020 Galaxies Nebulae Narrowband
Orion Constellation Time-lapse

Specification

Date Taken: 20/03/2018 Telescope: N/A Diameter: N/A Lens: 18-55mm (Focused at 21mm) Mount: SkyWatcher Star Adventurer Mini Camera: Canon EOS 1000D ISO: 1600 Exposure Light Frames: 250 x 30 sec Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Stacking program: Windows Movie Maker Post Processing: N/A
September - April
© Paul’s Astrophotography 2020