Finding M5 Cluster

M5 can be found north of the Constellations of Libra and Virgo. Locate a star called Mu Virginis (The bottom one of the two on the extreme left of Virgo) and Zubeneschamali (The top star in Libra in this picture. Create a virtual elongated triangle and M5 make the peak of this triangle.
(Image from SkySafari 6 Plus)

M5 Cluster

Description: Globula Cluster Common Name: Messier 5 Messier Catalogue: 5 NGC: 5904 Constellation: Serpens Size: 23 Arc Minutes Visual Magnitude: +5.65 Distance:24,000 Light Years

Image Specification

Date Taken: 30/03/2019 Dark Site?: Yes Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Reducer/Flattener?: Barlow: 2x Mount: iEXOS 100 PMC-Eight Guided?: Yes Guiding Software: PHD2 Filter: Semi-APO Camera: Canon EOS 1000D ISO: 800 Video: N/A Light Frames: 10 x 180 Seconds Total Exposure: 30 Minutes Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: BackYardEOS Stacking program: DeepSkyStacker Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3
March - August
Imaging The most important thing when imaging stars & clusters is to make sure that you have your focus bang on. It is worth spending the time to get your focus right on these objects. As I have mentioned before, you will get away with a perfectly good image from shorter exposures on clusters but to get the deep colours you need to take longer exposures. The image above is a combined exposure of 30 minutes (10 x 180 seconds) which also helps to bring out fainter stars in the background which gives a nice backdrop to the cluster in question.
© Paul’s Astrophotography 2020 Galaxies Nebulae Narrowband

M5 Cluster

Description: Globula Cluster Common Name: Messier 5 Messier Catalogue: 5 NGC: 5904 Constellation: Serpens Size: 23 Arc Minutes Visual Magnitude: +5.65 Distance:24,000 Light Years
March - August
Imaging The most important thing when imaging stars & clusters is to make sure that you have your focus bang on. It is worth spending the time to get your focus right on these objects. As I have mentioned before, you will get away with a perfectly good image from shorter exposures on clusters but to get the deep colours you need to take longer exposures. The image above is a combined exposure of 30 minutes (10 x 180 seconds) which also helps to bring out fainter stars in the background which gives a nice backdrop to the cluster in question.

Finding M5

Cluster

M5 can be found north of the Constellations of Libra and Virgo. Locate a star called Mu Virginis (The bottom one of the two on the extreme left of Virgo) and Zubeneschamali (The top star in Libra in this picture. Create a virtual elongated triangle and M5 make the peak of this triangle.

Image Specification

Date Taken: 30/03/2019 Dark Site?: Yes Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Reducer/Flattener?: Barlow: 2x Mount: iEXOS 100 PMC-Eight Guided?: Yes Guiding Software: PHD2 Filter: Semi-APO Camera: Canon EOS 1000D ISO: 800 Video: N/A Light Frames: 10 x 180 Seconds Total Exposure: 30 Minutes Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: BackYardEOS Stacking program: DeepSkyStacker Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3
© Paul’s Astrophotography 2020