Finding the Beehive Cluster

M44 the Beehive Cluster can be seen as a Nebulous patch from dark skies with the naked eye. The cluster sits in the Constellation of Cancer. Locate the star Pollux, the left hand twin in Gemini, then create an imaginary line from there through to Regulus, the bottom star of the Sickle in Leo. M44 is just below this line just under half way along.
(Image from SkySafari 6 Plus)

Beehive Cluster

Description: Open Cluster Common Name: Messier 44 Messier Catalogue: 44 NGC: 2632 Constellation: Cancer Size: 70 Arc Minutes Visual Magnitude: +3.09 Distance: 610 Light Years

Image Specification

Date Taken: 24/03/2019 Dark Site?: No Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Reducer/Flattener?: Barlow: N/A Mount: iEXOS 100 PMC-Eight Guided?: Yes Guiding Software: PHD2 Filter: Semi-APO Camera: Canon EOS 1000D ISO: 1600 Video: N/A Light Frames: 11 x 40 Seconds Total Exposure: 7 mins 33 sec Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: BackYardEOS Stacking program: DeepSkyStacker Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3
November - May
Imaging Open Clusters are usually easy to image. You don’t need massively long exposures. This image consists of 11 exposures at 40 seconds each. You can take longer exposures to capture more of the fainter stars, but this is down to your preference. Cluster and the like also don’t need a lot of post processing, just mess about with the levels and see what works best for you.
© Paul’s Astrophotography 2020 Galaxies Nebulae Narrowband

Beehive Cluster

Description: Open Cluster Common Name: Messier 44 Messier Catalogue: 44 NGC: 2632 Constellation: Cancer Size: 70 Arc Minutes Visual Magnitude: +3.09 Distance: 610 Light Years
Nov - May
Imaging Open Clusters are usually easy to image. You don’t need massively long exposures. This image consists of 11 exposures at 40 seconds each. You can take longer exposures to capture more of the fainter stars, but this is down to your preference. Cluster and the like also don’t need a lot of post processing, just mess about with the levels and see what works best for you.

Image Specification

Date Taken: 24/03/2019 Dark Site?: No Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Reducer/Flattener?: Barlow: N/A Mount: iEXOS 100 PMC-Eight Guided?: Yes Guiding Software: PHD2 Filter: Semi-APO Camera: Canon EOS 1000D ISO: 1600 Video: N/A Light Frames: 11 x 40 Seconds Total Exposure: 7 mins 33 sec Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: BackYardEOS Stacking program: DeepSkyStacker Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3

Finding the

Beehive Cluster

M44 the Beehive Cluster can be seen as a Nebulous patch from dark skies with the naked eye. The cluster sits in the Constellation of Cancer. Locate the star Pollux, the left hand twin in Gemini, then create an imaginary line from there through to Regulus, the bottom star of the Sickle in Leo. M44 is just below this line just under half way along.
© Paul’s Astrophotography 2020