Finding Heart Nebula

The Heart Nebula lies to the left hand side and slightly south of the big “W” that is the constellation of Cassiopeia. Imaging *UPDATE* Now that I have a reducer/flattener I decided to have another go at the Heart Nebula due to its size. What the reducer/flattener does is to 1) reduce the focal length, which in turn gives me a larger field of view, 2) It makes the telescope “faster”, this means that I can shorten my exposure times and or amount of exposures taken and 3) It flattens the image. This means that I do not get elongated stars around the edge of the image. As you can see by comparing the image above to the one below with the reducer/flattener, the entire Nebula is in the image as opposed to only a little bit of it in the image below, also the stars are round to the edges. Also, this image was taken during a 99% Moon and it looked like daylight but with some heavy editing I am happy with the result. *Original Post* Once again I didn’t realise quite how big this Nebula is and low & behold, it was too large to fit the whole nebula in to the field of view. Either way, I am happy with how this image has come out. I will be spending some time on this Nebula and i will image the whole thing and “stitch” them together to show the complete Nebula. Watch This Space.
(Image from SkySafari 5 Pro)

Image Specification

Date Taken: 26/09/2018 Dark Site?: No - 99% Moon Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Reducer/flattener: x0.8 Mount: SkyWatcher Star Adventurer Guided?: Yes Guideing Software: PHD2 Filter: UHC Camera: Canon EOS 1000D ISO: 400 Video: N/A Light Frames: 10 x 180 Seconds Light Frames: 03 x 120 Seconds Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: BackYardEOS Stacking program: DeepSkyStacker Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3

Heart Nebula

Description: Emission Nebula Common Name: Heart Nebula Messier Catalogue: N/A NGC: N/A Constellation: Cassiopeia Size: 60.0 x 60.0 Arc Minutes Visual Magnitude: +6.50 Distance: 6.2 Kilo Light Years
Circumpolar, Never Sets

Specification

Date Taken: 01/09/2018 Dark Site?: Semi Dark Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Mount: SkyWatcher Star Adventurer Guided?: Yes Guideing Software: PHD2 Filter: UHC Camera: Canon EOS 1000D ISO: 1600 Video: N/A Light Frames: 18 x 180 Seconds Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: BackYardEOS Stacking program: DeepSkyStacker Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3

Image Specification

Date Taken: 02/10/2019 Dark Site?: Yes Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Reducer/Flattener?: Flattener Barlow: N/A Mount: iEXOS 100 PMC-Eight Guided?: Yes Guiding Software: PHD2 Filter: Semi-APO Camera: Canon EOS 450D ISO: 800 Video: N/A Light Frames: 10 x 240 Seconds Total Exposure: 40 minutes Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: BackYardEOS Stacking program: DeepSkyStacker Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3
© Paul’s Astrophotography 2020

Finding Heart

Nebula

The Heart Nebula lies to the left hand side and slightly south of the big “W” that is the constellation of Cassiopeia.

Image Specification

Date Taken: 26/09/2018 Dark Site?: No - 99% Moon Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Reducer/flattener: x0.8 Mount: SkyWatcher Star Adventurer Guided?: Yes Guideing Software: PHD2 Filter: UHC Camera: Canon EOS 1000D ISO: 400 Video: N/A Light Frames: 10 x 180 Seconds Light Frames: 03 x 120 Seconds Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: BackYardEOS Stacking program: DeepSkyStacker Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3

Heart Nebula

Description: Emission Nebula Common Name: Heart Nebula Messier Catalogue: N/A NGC: N/A Constellation: Cassiopeia Size: 60.0 x 60.0 Arc Minutes Visual Magnitude: +6.50 Distance: 6.2 Kilo Light Years
Circumpolar, Never Sets

Specification

Date Taken: 01/09/2018 Dark Site?: Semi Dark Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Mount: SkyWatcher Star Adventurer Guided?: Yes Guideing Software: PHD2 Filter: UHC Camera: Canon EOS 1000D ISO: 1600 Video: N/A Light Frames: 18 x 180 Seconds Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: BackYardEOS Stacking program: DeepSkyStacker Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3
Imaging *UPDATE* Now that I have a reducer/flattener I decided to have another go at the Heart Nebula due to its size. What the reducer/flattener does is to 1) reduce the focal length, which in turn gives me a larger field of view, 2) It makes the telescope “faster”, this means that I can shorten my exposure times and or amount of exposures taken and 3) It flattens the image. This means that I do not get elongated stars around the edge of the image. As you can see by comparing the image above to the one below with the reducer/flattener, the entire Nebula is in the image as opposed to only a little bit of it in the image below, also the stars are round to the edges. Also, this image was taken during a 99% Moon and it looked like daylight but with some heavy editing I am happy with the result. *Original Post* Once again I didn’t realise quite how big this Nebula is and low & behold, it was too large to fit the whole nebula in to the field of view. Either way, I am happy with how this image has come out. I will be spending some time on this Nebula and i will image the whole thing and “stitch” them together to show the complete Nebula. Watch This Space.

Image Specification

Date Taken: 02/10/2019 Dark Site?: Yes Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Reducer/Flattener?: Flattener Barlow: N/A Mount: iEXOS 100 PMC-Eight Guided?: Yes Guiding Software: PHD2 Filter: Semi-APO Camera: Canon EOS 450D ISO: 800 Video: N/A Light Frames: 10 x 240 Seconds Total Exposure: 40 minutes Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: BackYardEOS Stacking program: DeepSkyStacker Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3
© Paul’s Astrophotography 2020