© paulsastrophotography 2018
What is a Total Lunar Eclipse?
A Lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth’s shadow. As we know, the Moon shines due to it reflecting of the sun off of its surface so, when the Moon passes through the Earth’s shadow we get a Lunar eclipse This can only occur when the Moon, Earth and sun are aligned (called syzygy) causing the Earth to block the light of the Sun from hitting the Moon.
Unlike during a Solar eclipse, the Moon will not disappear from view as even though the light from the sun is completely blocked by the Earth, the Moon is dimly illuminated by refracted light from the Earth’s atmosphere which gives the Moon a red colour, hence why it is sometimes called a Blood Moon.
How to view and image the Eclipse.
The best way to view the eclipse is to find a spot that looks south-west through to north-west in the early hours of Monday the 21st of January 2019 (GMT). Ensure that you are ready Sunday night as you dont want to wake up on Monday morning to find out that you have missed the Eclipse!! 02:36 The eclipse starts with the Penumbral Eclipse. 03:33 The Partial Eclipse begins 04:41 Total Eclipse starts 05:12 Maximum point of eclipse 05:43 Totality will end. This is where the moon starts to pass out of the Earth’s main shadow. 06:50 The partial eclipse ends with the Penumbral Eclipse 07:48 Eclipse end The Moon will be in the south-west and it will be setting in the West. When it comes to recording the event there are a few ways to do this. I will be making a time lapse video and I will be taking single images every minute and creating a video from the still frames but you can also record the whole event or just take pictures with any camera that you have to hand, including your mobile phone. Click HERE for an amazing guide on how to photograph an Eclipse and below is a guide to the different exposure times throughout the Eclipse, etc…
Exposure times © Fred Espenak
In the early hours of Monday the 21st of January 2019 we were blessed with a total Lunar eclipse. What was more amazing was that we had probably the only clear night since November 2018. The previous attempt that we had at a Lunar eclipse was back in July 2018 and that was a total write off that ended up in our group imaging a thunder storm, so it wasn’t too much of a wasted night. But unlike the July eclipse, where we would have only seen part of the event, this time we would witness the entire eclipse. And boy it was worth waiting for. The event was hosted in conjunction with Paul’s Astrophotography, FOTH & Worthing Astronomers and we had an amazing turnout of both imagers and eye-ballers. Me and another member decided to start early to get some visual astronomy in and we were set up by 20:30 Sunday night. We had a great time looking at brighter targets, due to the full Moon washing out the sky, like the Orion Nebula, Double Cluster, the lovely double star Mizar and a favourite of ours, the stunning Owl Cluster. In hindsight we should have not started so early as, even though we had a great visual session, it was bloody cold and our feet were like little blocks of ice. At around 11pm the normal sane people started to turn up and we set up our imaging equipment and got ready for the main event. I used my StarWave 70ED telescope with a ZWO120MC camera along with a x0.8 reducer. All this was plonked on top of my Sky-Watcher EQ3-2. Image capture was taken using ASICAP with processing made in PhotoShop CS3. The eclipse started at 02:36 with the Moon entering in to the Penumbra but this wasn’t really noticeable and there wasn’t much point imaging just the full Moon. The actual eclipse started at 03:33 and this started with the partial eclipse. The image to the far left of my picture above was taken at this point. I then took an image every 2 minutes throughout this phase of the eclipse. It was surprisingly dramatic throughout this part of the eclipse even though it lasted for over an hour until the Moon totally disappeared. With a tweak of my exposure settings all of a sudden a full deep red Moon appeared on the screen which could only mean that we were now in totality. It was rather surreal seeing the Moon turn a deep red colour and it was certainly an experience. Totality lasted for an hour which meant we had time to wander around and have a chat. It was then a mater of doing it all in reverse as the Moon came out of eclipse. A thoroughly enjoyable night was had by all. I am creating a gallery of images that people took of the eclipse that will sit on this page. If you have any eclipse images that you would like the world to see then send an email to paul@paulsastrophotography.co.uk
User Eclipse Images
Steve Bassett Canon 450D 500mm Sigma Lens 1/3200sec to 1.6 Seconds Andrew Newbold Canon EOS 1300D Tamron 55-200mm Lens Paul Ibbitson StarWave 70ED ZWO120MC x0.8 Reducer
If you would like to see your own eclipse 2019 image here just send your picture to this email address paul@paulsastrophotography.co.uk
Meade 127 Canon EOS 60Da
John Brick
Sophie Watts ISO 800 - 3200 1/3200 - 3/10 Stuart Hilliker Matthew Bell Altair LightWave 72ED Triplet Ioptron IEQ45 Pro 1.6 Sec ISO 800
Hover on image for details Click to enlarge
Graham Devenish Olympus OMD EM1 Mk 2 150mm Lens with 1.4 converter 6 Sec ISO 800 Greg Stanmore Star Travel 102 Canon 550D 1 Sec ISO 1600
What is a Total Lunar Eclipse?
A Lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth’s shadow. As we know, the Moon shines due to it reflecting of the sun off of its surface so, when the Moon passes through the Earth’s shadow we get a Lunar eclipse This can only occur when the Moon, Earth and sun are aligned (called syzygy) causing the Earth to block the light of the Sun from hitting the Moon.
Unlike during a Solar eclipse, the Moon will not disappear from view as even though the light from the sun is completely blocked by the Earth, the Moon is dimly illuminated by refracted light from the Earth’s atmosphere which gives the Moon a red colour, hence why it is sometimes called a Blood Moon.
How to view and image the Eclipse.
The best way to view the eclipse is to find a spot that looks south-west through to north-west in the early hours of Monday the 21st of January 2019 (GMT). Ensure that you are ready Sunday night as you dont want to wake up on Monday morning to find out that you have missed the Eclipse!! 02:36 The eclipse starts with the Penumbral Eclipse. 03:33 The Partial Eclipse begins 04:41 Total Eclipse starts 05:12 Maximum point of eclipse 05:43 Totality will end. This is where the moon starts to pass out of the Earth’s main shadow. 06:50 The partial eclipse ends with the Penumbral Eclipse 07:48 Eclipse end The Moon will be in the south-west and it will be setting in the West. When it comes to recording the event there are a few ways to do this. I will be making a time lapse video and I will be taking single images every minute and creating a video from the still frames but you can also record the whole event or just take pictures with any camera that you have to hand, including your mobile phone. Click HERE for an amazing guide on how to photograph an Eclipse and below is a guide to the different exposure times throughout the Eclipse, etc…
Exposure times © Fred Espenak
Total Lunar Eclipse January 2019
© paulsastrophotography 2018
In the early hours of Monday the 21st of January 2019 we were blessed with a total Lunar eclipse. What was more amazing was that we had probably the only clear night since November 2018. The previous attempt that we had at a Lunar eclipse was back in July 2018 and that was a total write off that ended up in our group imaging a thunder storm, so it wasn’t too much of a wasted night. But unlike the July eclipse, where we would have only seen part of the event, this time we would witness the entire eclipse. And boy it was worth waiting for. The event was hosted in conjunction with Paul’s Astrophotography, FOTH & Worthing Astronomers and we had an amazing turnout of both imagers and eye- ballers. Me and another member decided to start early to get some visual astronomy in and we were set up by 20:30 Sunday night. We had a great time looking at brighter targets, due to the full Moon washing out the sky, like the Orion Nebula, Double Cluster, the lovely double star Mizar and a favourite of ours, the stunning Owl Cluster. In hindsight we should have not started so early as, even though we had a great visual session, it was bloody cold and our feet were like little blocks of ice. At around 11pm the normal sane people started to turn up and we set up our imaging equipment and got ready for the main event. I used my StarWave 70ED telescope with a ZWO120MC camera along with a x0.8 reducer. All this was plonked on top of my Sky-Watcher EQ3-2. Image capture was taken using ASICAP with processing made in PhotoShop CS3. The eclipse started at 02:36 with the Moon entering in to the Penumbra but this wasn’t really noticeable and there wasn’t much point imaging just the full Moon. The actual eclipse started at 03:33 and this started with the partial eclipse. The image to the far left of my picture above was taken at this point. I then took an image every 2 minutes throughout this phase of the eclipse. It was surprisingly dramatic throughout this part of the eclipse even though it lasted for over an hour until the Moon totally disappeared. With a tweak of my exposure settings all of a sudden a full deep red Moon appeared on the screen which could only mean that we were now in totality. It was rather surreal seeing the Moon turn a deep red colour and it was certainly an experience. Totality lasted for an hour which meant we had time to wander around and have a chat. It was then a mater of doing it all in reverse as the Moon came out of eclipse. A thoroughly enjoyable night was had by all. I am creating a gallery of images that people took of the eclipse that will sit on this page. If you have any eclipse images that you would like the world to see then send an email to paul@paulsastrophotography.co.uk
User Eclipse Images
If you would like to see your own eclipse 2019 image here just send your picture to this email address paul@paulsastrophotography.co.uk
Stuart Hilliker
Hover on image for details Click to enlarge
Paul Ibbitson StarWave 70ED ZWO120MC x0.8 Reducer Steve Bassett Canon 450D 500mm Sigma Lens 1/3200sec to 1.6 Seconds Andrew Newbold Canon EOS 1300D Tamron 55-200mm Lens John Brick Matthew Bell Altair LightWave 72ED Triplet Ioptron IEQ45 Pro 1.6 Sec ISO 800 Graham Devenish Olympus OMD EM1 Mk 2 150mm Lens with 1.4 converter 6 Sec ISO 800 Greg Stanmore Star Travel 102 Canon 550D 1 Sec ISO 1600 Sophie Watts ISO 800 - 3200 1/3200 - 3/10
Total Lunar Eclipse January 2019