© paulsastrophotography 2018

This Months Skies:

November (Page 1)

This page is dedicated to what will be happening over the coming Month. There are details of what to look out for from galaxies, stars, planets and DSO’s and much more. The information here is kindly supplied by the Friends on the Hill Astronomy Group, Worthing. UK.
November This Months consists of a very extensive list so I have divided it up over two pages. On this page are the usual segments, Page 2 has the additional information about a host of interesting stars like Double Stars, Coloured Doubles & Variable Stars. 1 | 2 Meteor Showers Taurids We start the month with the modest Southern and Northern Taurids, These Showers are active throughout the month but have a low ZHR. Leonids The Leonids are a Major Meteor Shower associated with comet 55P Swift -Tuttle, and emanate from the area of Regulus (Alpha Leonis). The Leonids are a prolific Shower and known for their Fireballs and earthgrazer meteors. Fireballs are large explosions of light and colour that can persist longer than the average meteor. The meteors are fast at 44 miles per second. Deep Sky A walk through Andromeda The Constellation ANDROMEDA is visible in the Northern Hemisphere from August through to January. It is a large Constellation covering 722 square degrees. It contains 3 well known Messier objects, the large Spiral Galaxy M31 which is renown for being the furthest object visible to the naked eye at 2.5 million light years distance. In the same field of view as M31 are the smaller galaxies M32 and M110. There is also the edge on spiral galaxy NGC 891 also known as C23. At Mag 10 this galaxy is visible as a small elongated smudge in small scopes. NGC 7662 The Blue Snowball Nebula at Mag 9 can also be seen in small scopes. Star cluster NGC 752 (C28) Is a Mag 6 open cluster of 60-70 stars it contains short chains, irregular clumps and lots of double stars . Close to the cluster is 56 Andromeda SAO 55107 a nice Gold/Orange double of mags 5.7 & 5.9 Brightest stars in Andromeda Alpheratz, Alpha Andromeda SAO 73765 a binary system Of Mag 2.07 Mirach. Beta -:- -:SAO 54471 Red Giant mag2.07 Almach. Gamma. --::SAO 3734. Orange Double. mag 2.26 Delta --::-- SAO 54058 Orange Double. mag 3.28 Omicron --::-SAO 62609 Double star. Mag 3.26 Lambda. --::-SAO 53204 Yellow Giant. Mag 3.82 Mu --::-- SAO 54281. Double white dwarf. Mag 3.87 Zeta --::-- SAO 74267. Orange Giant. Mag 4.08 Upsilon -:- SAO 37362. Yellow white dwarf. Mag 4.05 Kappa. --::- SAO 53264. Double blue/white sub giant Mag 4.14 Phi. --:-- SAO.36972. V Tight binary system mag 4.35 Iota --::-- SAO 53216. Blue White dwarf. Mag 4.28 Epsilon -::- SAO 74164. Yellow giant Mag 4.37 Eta --::-- SAO 74388. Binary system. Mag 4.40 Sigma --;;- SAO 64708. White dwarf. Mag 4.52 Nu --::-- SAO 36699. Close Binary. Mag 4.52 Theta --::-- SAO 53777. Double white dwarf Mag 4.5 And some nice Doubles, triples and multi stars which I have actually seen in the 127 Mak at 47x 8 And, SAO 52871 Orange/Red, combine in a group with SAO 52899 Yellow/White, Pi And SAO 54033 Blue/White 56 And SAO 55107 Gold/Orange SAO 52912 Orange/Orange SAO 52899 Yellow/White 79 And SAO 36832/36833 Blue/White SAO 55331 White/White SAO 73656 Yellow/Yellow 59 And SAO 55330. Blue/White GA And SAO 36248 2 Red Dwarf Stars Nebulae Orion Nebula M42 (NGC 1976) - mag. +4.0, the Great Orion Nebula or Orion Nebula is the constellation's most celebrated deep sky object. It's an emission / reflection nebula and star forming region that spans more than a degree of sky. M42 is easily visible to the naked eye and a spectacular sight through all forms of optical instrument. It contains multiple star theta1 (θ1) Orionis. This group of hot stars, known as the Trapezium, illuminates the surrounding nebula. The Trapezium name derives from the four main stars that are visible through small telescopes, although apertures of greater than 150mm (6-inch) or so are required to easily reveal another two stars. M42 is 1,340 light-years from Earth. Messier 43 - M43 - De Mairan's Nebula (Emission/Reflection) M43 is a HII region located in the constellation of Orion that was discovered by Jean-Jacques Dortous de Mairan sometime before 1731. As part of the famous Orion Nebula (M42), it's positioned just north of the main nebula and separated from it by a narrow dust lane. With an apparent mag. of +9.0, M43 is about 100 times fainter than M42, but still bright enough to be seen with binoculars. Occasionally, ninth mag. nebulae like M43 can be difficult to find - especially if located in barren parts of the sky - but not this one. Firstly, it's located in majestic Orion, perhaps the most recognizable of all constellations, secondly it's part of the Orion Nebula and therefore positioned right next to the great showpiece object and finally it has a relatively high surface brightness. Of course, finding M42 is easy, it's positioned 5 degrees south of the three bright stars that form Orion's belt (Mintaka, Alnilam and Alnitak). M43 is located just 8 arc minutes north of M42 surrounding a 7th magnitude star. M43 (and M42) are best seen during the months of December, January and February. NGC 2024 Flame Nebula NGC 2024 - also known as the Flame Nebula is a glowing area of gas about 0.5 degrees wide just east of Alnitak (ζ Orionis). It's a bright nebula that despite significant interference from second magnitude Alnitak, shows up surprisingly well in telescopes. Scopes of 150mm (6-inch) or more reveal a circular disk of nebulosity, dissected by a prominent dark band. At high powers, with Alnitak moved out of the field of view, more bands and subtle bright and dark patches are visible. NGC 2024 is a fine emission nebula that would be spectacular if it were not located next to such a bright star. It has an apparent diameter of 30 arc minutes and is about 900 to 1,500 light-years away. NGC 2174 (Nebula) and NGC 2175 (Open Cluster) High up in the northern constellation reaches close to the Gemini border is NGC 2174, another star forming region 6,400 light-years distant. Nicknamed the Monkey Head Nebula due to its curious shape, this fairly ruddy emission nebula has been twice spectacularly imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope. When seen through medium size amateur scopes of order of 200mm (8-inch) aperture, it appears fan shaped, slightly brighter towards the centre with faint dust bands visible. It total, it spans 40 arc minutes but only about half of that can be seen visually. On the southern edge of NGC 2174, embedded in the nebula, is large open cluster NGC 2175. This group of about 60 stars, spread across 18 arc minutes of sky, shines at magnitude +6.8 and is easily visible in binoculars. Small 80mm (3.1-inch) scopes show a grainy condensed cluster of stars. Up to about 25 stars of differing magnitudes are visible in larger scopes, making a nice view. IC 434 and Barnard 33 (Horsehead Nebula) IC 434 and Barnard 33 (Horsehead Nebula) - Staying in the region surrounding Alnitak, but looking south of the star lies emission nebula IC 434. On a good night with a 150mm (6-inch) scope it appears as a tenuous faint wispy strip of light extending in a north to south direction. Averted vision helps, as does moving Alnitak out of the field of view. IC 434 covers 60 x 10 arc minutes of apparent sky and normally would be relatively unremarkable except for one major detail, its home to famous dark nebula Barnard 33, otherwise known as the Horsehead Nebula. Positioned 0.5 degrees south of Alnitak, this cloud of dust overlays the emission nebula, cutting out a shape that looks like a horse's head or a black knight from a chess game. Unfortunately, while the Horsehead Nebula is spectacular when imaged, it's rather difficult to observe visually. The low contrast and small 5 arc minute size contribute to making this a tricky target. Some observers have reported seeing it with 150mm (6-inch) scopes, while others have failed even with 500mm (20-inch) scopes. M78 (NGC 2068) M78 (NGC 2068) - mag. +8.2, is a small elongated reflection nebula, located a few degrees northeast of Orion's belt. It's the brightest reflection nebula in the sky and can be seen with binoculars as a misty patch of light. Medium size amateur scopes reveal a wispy twisty nebula with a brighter northern section, surrounding a pair of 10th magnitude stars. NGC 1973 / NGC 1975 / NGC 1977 NGC 1973 / NGC 1975 / NGC 1977 - are a group of three reflection nebulae usually overlooked due to the prominence of nearby M42. This grouping is positioned half a degree northeast of the great nebula. Typical of reflection nebulae, they appear bluish resulting from light reflection from hot young stars by the interstellar dust, with darker regions dividing the three NGC objects. Overall it shines at magnitude +7.0 and covers 40 x 25 arc minutes of sky. Just to the north is open cluster NGC 1981. The object is listed as number 279 in the Sharpless Catalogue and also is known as the Running Man nebula after Texas Astronomical Society member Jason Ware, who remarked that it looked like a man running through the cosmic dust cloud. It's best seen in medium to large size scopes. Open Clusters NGC 1662 mag. +6.4, is a loose open cluster visible with binoculars. The brightest components are just about resolvable with binoculars. It contains nearly a dozen 9th magnitude stars, spread across a diameter of 20 arc minutes. Small scopes will show a few fainter stars and through 250mm (10-inch) instruments, up to 30 stars are visible. Although loose, it stands out against the black backdrop. NGC 1981 Is a large bright scattered cluster of 20 stars located a degree north of the Orion Nebula. At magnitude +4.6, it's visible to the naked eye as a misty unresolved patch of light. Binoculars, such as 10x50s, reveal about 10 stars with the brightest members easily visible with direct vision. In total, this lovely cluster contains about 20 stars spread across 25 arc minutes of sky. Larger scopes hint at faint nebulosity in the background. NGC 1981 Is about 7.5 million years old and 1,250 light-years distant. It marks the northern point of the sword of Orion. NGC 2169 At mag. +5.9, is a small cluster visible in binoculars that forms a small triangle in the northeastern part of the constellation with stars nu (ν Ori - mag. +4.4) and xi (ξ Ori - mag. +4.5). Through 10x50 binoculars, this pretty area of sky reveals a somewhat hazy compact looking cluster surrounded by streams of faint stars. The brightest individual component shines at magnitude +6.9 and the brightest few stars are resolvable in binoculars. It's sometimes called the 37 Cluster because it resembles the number 37 when seen through medium size scopes. NGC 2169 Is about seven arc minutes in diameter with up to 30 stars. It's about eight million years old and is located 3,600 light-years away. NGC 2194 mag. +8.5, is a rich but faint cluster located a couple of degrees southeast of NGC 2169. Covering 10 arc minutes of sky and containing 80 members, NGC 2194 is well resolved in larger amateur scopes. At high magnifications, of the order of 200x, a 300mm (12-inch) instrument reveals a teardrop shaped patch of light with many dim but resolvable stars. It has a flattened shape
© paulsastrophotography 2018

This Months Skies:

November (Page 1)

This Months consists of a very extensive list so I have divided it up over two pages. On this page are the usual segments with Page 2 having the additional information about a host of interesting stars like Double Stars, Coloured Doubles & Variable Stars. 1 | 2 Deep Sky A walk through Andromeda The Constellation ANDROMEDA is visible in the Northern Hemisphere from August through to January. It is a large Constellation covering 722 square degrees. It contains 3 well known Messier objects, the large Spiral Galaxy M31 which is renown for being the furthest object visible to the naked eye at 2.5 million light years distance. In the same field of view as M31 are the smaller galaxies M32 and M110. There is also the edge on spiral galaxy NGC 891 also known as C23. At Mag 10 this galaxy is visible as a small elongated smudge in small scopes. NGC 7662 The Blue Snowball Nebula at Mag 9 can also be seen in small scopes. Star cluster NGC 752 (C28) Is a Mag 6 open cluster of 60-70 stars it contains short chains, irregular clumps and lots of double stars . Close to the cluster is 56 Andromeda SAO 55107 a nice Gold/Orange double of mags 5.7 & 5.9 Brightest stars in Andromeda Alpheratz, Alpha Andromeda SAO 73765 a binary system Of Mag 2.07 Mirach. Beta -:- -:SAO 54471 Red Giant mag2.07 Almach. Gamma. --::SAO 3734. Orange Double. mag 2.26 Delta --::-- SAO 54058 Orange Double. mag 3.28 Omicron --::-SAO 62609 Double star. Mag 3.26 Lambda. --::-SAO 53204 Yellow Giant. Mag 3.82 Mu --::-- SAO 54281. Double white dwarf. Mag 3.87 Zeta --::-- SAO 74267. Orange Giant. Mag 4.08 Upsilon -:- SAO 37362. Yellow white dwarf. Mag 4.05 Kappa. --::- SAO 53264. Double blue/white sub giant Mag 4.14 Phi. --:-- SAO.36972. V Tight binary system mag 4.35 Iota --::-- SAO 53216. Blue White dwarf. Mag 4.28 Epsilon -::- SAO 74164. Yellow giant Mag 4.37 Eta --::-- SAO 74388. Binary system. Mag 4.40 Sigma --;;- SAO 64708. White dwarf. Mag 4.52 Nu --::-- SAO 36699. Close Binary. Mag 4.52 Theta --::-- SAO 53777. Double white dwarf Mag 4.5 And some nice Doubles, triples and multi stars which I have actually seen in the 127 Mak at 47x 8 And, SAO 52871 Orange/Red, combine in a group with SAO 52899 Yellow/White, Pi And SAO 54033 Blue/White 56 And SAO 55107 Gold/Orange SAO 52912 Orange/Orange SAO 52899 Yellow/White 79 And SAO 36832/36833 Blue/White SAO 55331 White/White SAO 73656 Yellow/Yellow 59 And SAO 55330. Blue/White GA And SAO 36248 2 Red Dwarf Stars Nebulae Orion Nebula M42 (NGC 1976) - mag. +4.0, the Great Orion Nebula or Orion Nebula is the constellation's most celebrated deep sky object. It's an emission / reflection nebula and star forming region that spans more than a degree of sky. M42 is easily visible to the naked eye and a spectacular sight through all forms of optical instrument. It contains multiple star theta1 (θ1) Orionis. This group of hot stars, known as the Trapezium, illuminates the surrounding nebula. The Trapezium name derives from the four main stars that are visible through small telescopes, although apertures of greater than 150mm (6-inch) or so are required to easily reveal another two stars. M42 is 1,340 light-years from Earth. Messier 43 - M43 - De Mairan's Nebula (Emission/Reflection) M43 is a HII region located in the constellation of Orion that was discovered by Jean-Jacques Dortous de Mairan sometime before 1731. As part of the famous Orion Nebula (M42), it's positioned just north of the main nebula and separated from it by a narrow dust lane. With an apparent mag. of +9.0, M43 is about 100 times fainter than M42, but still bright enough to be seen with binoculars. Occasionally, ninth mag. nebulae like M43 can be difficult to find - especially if located in barren parts of the sky - but not this one. Firstly, it's located in majestic Orion, perhaps the most recognizable of all constellations, secondly it's part of the Orion Nebula and therefore positioned right next to the great showpiece object and finally it has a relatively high surface brightness. Of course, finding M42 is easy, it's positioned 5 degrees south of the three bright stars that form Orion's belt (Mintaka, Alnilam and Alnitak). M43 is located just 8 arc minutes north of M42 surrounding a 7th magnitude star. M43 (and M42) are best seen during the months of December, January and February. NGC 2024 Flame Nebula NGC 2024 - also known as the Flame Nebula is a glowing area of gas about 0.5 degrees wide just east of Alnitak (ζ Orionis). It's a bright nebula that despite significant interference from second magnitude Alnitak, shows up surprisingly well in telescopes. Scopes of 150mm (6-inch) or more reveal a circular disk of nebulosity, dissected by a prominent dark band. At high powers, with Alnitak moved out of the field of view, more bands and subtle bright and dark patches are visible. NGC 2024 is a fine emission nebula that would be spectacular if it were not located next to such a bright star. It has an apparent diameter of 30 arc minutes and is about 900 to 1,500 light-years away. NGC 2174 (Nebula) and NGC 2175 (Open Cluster) High up in the northern constellation reaches close to the Gemini border is NGC 2174, another star forming region 6,400 light-years distant. Nicknamed the Monkey Head Nebula due to its curious shape, this fairly ruddy emission nebula has been twice spectacularly imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope. When seen through medium size amateur scopes of order of 200mm (8-inch) aperture, it appears fan shaped, slightly brighter towards the centre with faint dust bands visible. It total, it spans 40 arc minutes but only about half of that can be seen visually. On the southern edge of NGC 2174, embedded in the nebula, is large open cluster NGC 2175. This group of about 60 stars, spread across 18 arc minutes of sky, shines at magnitude +6.8 and is easily visible in binoculars. Small 80mm (3.1-inch) scopes show a grainy condensed cluster of stars. Up to about 25 stars of differing magnitudes are visible in larger scopes, making a nice view. IC 434 and Barnard 33 (Horsehead Nebula) IC 434 and Barnard 33 (Horsehead Nebula) - Staying in the region surrounding Alnitak, but looking south of the star lies emission nebula IC 434. On a good night with a 150mm (6-inch) scope it appears as a tenuous faint wispy strip of light extending in a north to south direction. Averted vision helps, as does moving Alnitak out of the field of view. IC 434 covers 60 x 10 arc minutes of apparent sky and normally would be relatively unremarkable except for one major detail, its home to famous dark nebula Barnard 33, otherwise known as the Horsehead Nebula. Positioned 0.5 degrees south of Alnitak, this cloud of dust overlays the emission nebula, cutting out a shape that looks like a horse's head or a black knight from a chess game. Unfortunately, while the Horsehead Nebula is spectacular when imaged, it's rather difficult to observe visually. The low contrast and small 5 arc minute size contribute to making this a tricky target. Some observers have reported seeing it with 150mm (6-inch) scopes, while others have failed even with 500mm (20-inch) scopes. M78 (NGC 2068) M78 (NGC 2068) - mag. +8.2, is a small elongated reflection nebula, located a few degrees northeast of Orion's belt. It's the brightest reflection nebula in the sky and can be seen with binoculars as a misty patch of light. Medium size amateur scopes reveal a wispy twisty nebula with a brighter northern section, surrounding a pair of 10th magnitude stars. NGC 1973 / NGC 1975 / NGC 1977 NGC 1973 / NGC 1975 / NGC 1977 - are a group of three reflection nebulae usually overlooked due to the prominence of nearby M42. This grouping is positioned half a degree northeast of the great nebula. Typical of reflection nebulae, they appear bluish resulting from light reflection from hot young stars by the interstellar dust, with darker regions dividing the three NGC objects. Overall it shines at magnitude +7.0 and covers 40 x 25 arc minutes of sky. Just to the north is open cluster NGC 1981. The object is listed as number 279 in the Sharpless Catalogue and also is known as the Running Man nebula after Texas Astronomical Society member Jason Ware, who remarked that it looked like a man running through the cosmic dust cloud. It's best seen in medium to large size scopes. Open Clusters NGC 1662 mag. +6.4, is a loose open cluster visible with binoculars. The brightest components are just about resolvable with binoculars. It contains nearly a dozen 9th magnitude stars, spread across a diameter of 20 arc minutes. Small scopes will show a few fainter stars and through 250mm (10-inch) instruments, up to 30 stars are visible. Although loose, it stands out against the black backdrop. NGC 1981 Is a large bright scattered cluster of 20 stars located a degree north of the Orion Nebula. At magnitude +4.6, it's visible to the naked eye as a misty unresolved patch of light. Binoculars, such as 10x50s, reveal about 10 stars with the brightest members easily visible with direct vision. In total, this lovely cluster contains about 20 stars spread across 25 arc minutes of sky. Larger scopes hint at faint nebulosity in the background. NGC 1981 Is about 7.5 million years old and 1,250 light-years distant. It marks the northern point of the sword of Orion. NGC 2169 At mag. +5.9, is a small cluster visible in binoculars that forms a small triangle in the northeastern part of the constellation with stars nu (ν Ori - mag. +4.4) and xi (ξ Ori - mag. +4.5). Through 10x50 binoculars, this pretty area of sky reveals a somewhat hazy compact looking cluster surrounded by streams of faint stars. The brightest individual component shines at magnitude +6.9 and the brightest few stars are resolvable in binoculars. It's sometimes called the 37 Cluster because it resembles the number 37 when seen through medium size scopes. NGC 2169 Is about seven arc minutes in diameter with up to 30 stars. It's about eight million years old and is located 3,600 light-years away. NGC 2194 mag. +8.5, is a rich but faint cluster located a couple of degrees southeast of NGC 2169. Covering 10 arc minutes of sky and containing 80 members, NGC 2194 is well resolved in larger amateur scopes. At high magnifications, of the order of 200x, a 300mm (12-inch) instrument reveals a teardrop shaped patch of light with many dim but resolvable stars. It has a flattened shape
This page is dedicated to what will be happening over the coming Month. There are details of what to look out for from galaxies, stars, planets and DSO’s and much more. The information here is kindly supplied by the Friends on the Hill Astronomy Group, Worthing. UK. Please be aware that this list is created for the northern hemisphere by an Astronomy group in the UK and should be treated as such. Some objects may not be visible from your location.