Finding ISS Transit

To find the International Space Station you need to use an application on your phone or your PC that works out when the ISS will transit either the Moon or the Sun from your location. I will add some links to these sites/apps to the software page. it is then a mater of setting up and focusing on either the Moon or the Sun and waiting. Imaging To image the ISS during a transit can be fairly daunting as the ISS travels so fast. the transit above took all of 1.2 seconds so its best to be set up and ready quite a while before the event. Due to the speed of the transit you wont need to worry about tracking, as long as you have the whole Sun or Moon in you eyepiece or camera frame then you should be able to get it. It is certainly easier to have a tracking mount as you wont need to worry about having to manually tracking which obviously brings scope wobble in to play. The above image was made by filming the transit. This is the best way to capture it as filming has a high frame rate and you can then pick out the individual frames or create a stack like I have done above. Make sure that you start filming a few minutes before as your watch or clock may not be on the correct time.
© paulsastrophotography 2018

Specification

Date Taken: 06/08/2018 Dark Site?: Daytime Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Mount: SkyWatcher Star Adventurer Guided?: No Guideing Software: Filter: Semi APO Camera: ZWO ASI120m ISO: Video: 5 Minutes Light Frames: Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: ASICap Stacking program: Autostakkert Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3

International Space Station Solar Transit

Description: Satellite Common Name: International Space Station Messier Catalogue: N/A NGC: N/A Constellation: Lots Size: Tiny from Earth, Massive in space. Visual Magnitude: Shiny, also depends on whether the Astronauts have left the toilet light on. Distance: 253.5 Miles Up - ish

Finding ISS Transit

To find the International Space Station you need to use an application on your phone or your PC that works out when the ISS will transit either the Moon or the Sun from your location. I will add some links to these sites/apps to the software page. It is then a mater of setting up and focusing on either the Moon or the Sun and waiting. Imaging To image the ISS during a transit can be fairly daunting as the ISS travels so fast. the transit above took all of 1.2 seconds so its best to be set up and ready quite a while before the event. Due to the speed of the transit you wont need to worry about tracking, as long as you have the whole Sun or Moon in you eyepiece or camera frame then you should be able to get it. It is certainly easier to have a tracking mount as you wont need to worry about having to manually tracking which obviously brings scope wobble in to play. The above image was made by filming the transit. This is the best way to capture it as filming has a high frame rate and you can then pick out the individual frames or create a stack like I have done above. Make sure that you start filming a few minutes before as your watch or clock may not be on the correct time.
© paulsastrophotography 2018

Specification

Date Taken: 06/08/2018 Dark Site?: Daytime Telescope: Altair StarWave 70ED Diameter: 70mm Focal Length: 420mm Mount: SkyWatcher Star Adventurer Guided?: No Guideing Software: Filter: Semi APO Camera: ZWO ASI120m ISO: Video: 5 Minutes Light Frames: Dark Frames: Bias Frames: Flat Frames: Capture Program: ASICap Stacking program: Autostakkert Post Processing: PhotoShop CS3

International Space Station Solar Transit

Description: Satellite Common Name: International Space Station Messier Catalogue: N/A NGC: N/A Constellation: Lots Size: Tiny from Earth, Massive in space. Visual Magnitude: Shiny, also depends on whether the Astronauts have left the toilet light on. Distance: 253.5 Miles Up - ish